ORCID Integration Series: PANGAEA

This is the first in a series of posts describing how THOR partners have recently integrated ORCID in their disciplinary data repositories. This post describes ORCID integration in PANGAEA, the Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science.

PANGAEA is rolling out a new version of its website. Developers and designers are currently ironing out a few remaining open issues. The release is expected for autumn 2016. Among major improvements in search, design, and usability, a key new feature is the integration of ORCID.

The new feature enables existing PANGAEA users to connect their PANGAEA profile with their ORCID iD, as demonstrated in the video below. 

With this connection, PANGAEA obtains the validated ORCID iD of its users from ORCID. By connecting their ORCID iD, users can also choose to sign in to PANGAEA using ORCID, as an alternative to signing in using PANGAEA user credentials. This can be handy when a user is already signed in to ORCID, or it is quicker to recall ORCID credentials.

Obtaining the validated ORCID iDs of its users is significant for PANGAEA as, contrary to a researcher’s name, the iD is unambiguous: two researchers with the same name can be distinguished by their respective iDs. The iD is also persistent through possible changes in a person’s name: the same researcher may change marital status, or their name may appear in different permutations, at times appear with full name, initials for first name, and with or without middle name (initial). Furthermore, the iD is actionable and can be used to discover information about the researcher.

For researchers, the greatest advantage of connecting their ORCID iD to their PANGAEA profile is that PANGAEA can then record the relationships between dataset publication DOIs and contributor ORCID iDs. This information is then shared with the global network of PID infrastructures, and researchers benefit from automated updates to their ORCID Record for data published at PANGAEA, gaining unambiguous attribution for published datasets and benefiting from greater credit for sharing data early.

Let’s take a look at how the ORCID integration in PANGAEA is making a difference to Dr Alice Lefebvre, GLOMAR Associate Scientist at the MARUM Center for Marine Environmental Sciences of the University of Bremen.

Alice has recently joined ORCID and decided to claim the 14 data publications deposited at PANGAEA that she has authored. As a consequence, Alice gains a more complete ORCID Record, one that does not just include her journal article publications but also her authorship in data publications a record that better reflects her true contribution to the scientific record. Alice was also surprised to learn about DataCite and the overview DataCite provides about her contributions.

The upcoming release of the PANGAEA website automates the sharing of information with the global network of PID infrastructures. Authors of datasets published at PANGAEA who have connected their ORCID iD, like Alice, will benefit from a workflow that ensures information appears automatically and accurately on their ORCID Record.

This shows how far the integration between disciplinary repositories and the global network of PID infrastructures has come over the past years, and how the persistent identification of contributors and research artefacts together with infrastructures that aggregate, process, and share information about persistently identified resources are driving and shaping 21st-century attribution, credit, communication, and measurement of scholarly activity.

Want to Know More?
Readers interested in performing an ORCID integration in their own disciplinary repository can find more information in our recent report, ‘Demonstration of Services to Integrate ORCIDs into Data Records and Database Systems.